Finding Fellowship

The meaning and the movement

The title Finding Fellowship is a double entendre. Fellowship is the name of the lane that two of the film’s subjects, Kisha and Jason, grew up on. This documentary has been about actively unearthing and finding the history of the community in which they grew up and the street that they grew up on is a wonderful symbol of that community.

But the film is also about the power of people coming together in a shared interest and how that can only be achieved when actively pursued. In a world where we are often told that we are irreconcilably divided, we still believe in finding fellowship, and it’s this story that gives us hope.

  1. doers do

    A legacy takes root

    In just three short years after being freed, three former slaves acquired land to build a church and schoolhouse, including the central figure of the film, Gary Green.

  2. the pivot

    The Assassination of MLK, Jr.

    On April 4, 1968 Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. While America mourned, the community of Quince Orchard was inspired. While contemplating whether three fledgling Methodist churches – two white and one black – should merge into one, the news of MLK’s death hit the committee. The outcome was a new church and a changed community.

  3. the bicentennial

    150 Years of Progress

    In June 2018, the Quince Orchard community celebrated its 150th anniversary. At its annual Junefest, the community came together to kick off a preservation project for the Pleasant View Historic site, including the church and school.

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CONTRIBUTORS
3
FILMMAKERS
1
COMMUNITY

FINDING FELLOWSHIP,
BUILDING COMMUNITY

How can a community that evolved for more than 100 years only carry on in the memories of a few surviving members?

This story is personal to us because we are descendants of this place – our family has lived here since the Civil War. But it’s relevant to you too, wherever you live.

There are countless Quince Orchards all across the country. Communities that no longer exist on the map, not because of economic stagnation, but because of progress.

FINDING FELLOWSHIP,
BUILDING COMMUNITY

How can a community that evolved for more than 100 years only carry on in the memories of a few surviving members?

This story is personal to us because we are descendants of this place – our family has lived here since the Civil War. But it’s relevant to you too, wherever you live.

There are countless Quince Orchards all across the country. Communities that no longer exist on the map, not because of economic stagnation, but because of progress.

filmmakers

creative team

Jason Green
Jason Green

Director, Co-Producer

Kisha
Kisha Davis, MD

Co-Producer

Imanie Cheers
Imani M. Cheers

Creative Director

Contributors

We are grateful to all our contributors but want to give a special thank you to our key contributors and sponsors of this film.